University of Calgary
UofC Navigation

Beakerhead 2016 and Campus Collisions

Libraries and Cultural Resources is presenting a series of free, public events during Beakerhead, September 14 - 15.

Beakerhead is Calgary’s annual creative festival of arts, science and engineering. As a community sponsor, the University of Calgary coordinates a number of events and demonstrations involving students, staff and faculty members.

Wednesday, September 14

10:00am-4:00pm: Moving Data, Angela Rout

Moving Data: Data animations for public engagement (W & Th, 10-4)
Angela Rout
TFDL Foyer 

This display provides an animated visualization of spatial data. Current research investigates how visualizations like this can be used to support public engagement and decision making for urban planning projects. 

  • Angela Rout is a PhD student at the University of Calgary in Computational Media Design. 

10:00am-4:00pm: In Motion, Oksana Kryzhanivska with Jeffrey Boyd

In Motion (W & Th, 10-4; Oksana on site Thursday afternoon)
Oksana Kryzhanivska with Jeffrey Boyd
TFDL Foyer

Sense the physical connection to the universe intensified with scientific aesthetics of machine perception.

• Oksana Kryzhanivska is a PhD candidate in the Computational Media Design program at the University of Calgary.
• Jeffrey Boyd is an associate professor of computer science at the University of Calgary.

10:00am-4:00pm: The Big House, Brandon Hearty

The Big House (W & Th, 10-4)
Brandon Hearty
TFDL Foyer

"The Big House" is a project that speaks about the relationship between mental wellness and escapism by incorporating layers of symbolism with imagery that connects test animals to human environments and history.

• Brandon Hearty is a Canadian-born studio artist, currently pursuing his MFA through the University of Calgary.

10:00am-4:00pm: Subject to Change, Joshua Taron with Jason Johnson

Subject to Change (W & Th, 10-4)
Joshua Taron with Jason Johnson
TFDL Foyer 

This 8'x8'x8' sculpted cube is the fifth in a series of sukkah's designed and fabricated by The Laboratory for Integrative Design for Calgary's Beth Tzedec, Congregation. The Hebrew characters for sukkah are embedded in the plan and elevations of the cube which when projected through the mass of the object form the space for inhabitation - a place of social gathering and celebration marking the end of the harvest season. The form is constructed of urethane coated CNC milled EPS foam chunks bolted to one another via aluminum plate joints. It is designed for easy transport, assembly and disassembly as the sukkah will be reused annually during the festival of the Sukkot. This particular sukkah can sit in three different positions thus allowing different orientations from year to year.  

  • Joshua M. Taron is an Assistant Professor of Architecture in the Faculty of Environmental Design
  • Jason Johnson is an Associate Professor of Architecture in the Faculty of Environmental Design

10:00am-4:00pm: Slicing the Aurora, Sebastion Lay <et al.>

Slicing the Aurora (W & Th, 10-4)
Sebastian Lay, Jo Vermeulen, Charles Perin, Eric Donovan, Raimund Dachselt, & Sheelagh Carpendale
TFDL Foyer

'Slicing the Aurora' is an interactive installation that allows viewers to explore beautiful images and videos taken of the Aurora Borealis over Canada. Find interesting patterns and correlations in months' worth of data, sort and compare different nights, and learn more about the fascinating phenomenon of the Northern Lights. The installation uses the data of the AuroraMAX project by the Auroral Imaging Group at the University of Calgary.

  • Sebastian Lay & colleagues from Computer Science & Physics as well as the Interactive Media Lab, Dresden.  

10:00am-4:00pm: AlexG Infinity, Nathaniel Tan

AlexG Infinity (W, 10-4)
Nathaniel Tan
TFDL Foyer

AlexG Infinity is a video game featuring an innovative mix of a vertical shoot-'em-up and infinite runner and is the subject of Tan's research. Come experience the intensity, excitement and hand-animated characters, as you dodge, bomb, shoot and upgrade your way to the top of the leaderboards!

• Nathaniel Tan is a MSc student of the Computational Media Design Program at the University of Calgary.

10:30am-12:00pm: Differentiated Topographies, Vera Parlac, Stephen Holman & Cody Kupper

Differentiated Topographies (W, 10:30am – 12:00pm)
Vera Parlac, Stephen Holman, & Cody Kupper
TFDL Foyer

We are developing a surface that changes its topography and is actuated by shape memory alloy. This can be presented as a project or as an activity where others could play with components and actuation creating different choreographies of movement.

• Vera Parlac is an Assistant Professor of Architecture in the Faculty of Environmental Design
• Cody Kupper is an M.Arch Candidate, Faculty of Environmental Design
• Stephen Holman is M.Arch Candidate, Faculty of Environmental Design

11:00am-12:00pm: Blinded by Book Science, Maria Zytaruk

Blinded by Book Science

Maria Zytaruk

11-12, Gallery Hall 

What can getting down on all fours tells us about the shape of the first books?  What does the process of making olive oil have to do with the technology of print?  Why was the largest sheet of paper in the Renaissance only as wide as a man's arm span?  Come find out the answers to these questions and others during a demonstration with four-hundred-year-old books in Gallery Hall at the Taylor Family Digital Library.

  •  Maria Zytaruk is a faculty member at the University of Calgary who specializes in book history and material culture.  

11:00am-12:00pm: Augmented Reality with HoloCell, Christian Jacob

Augmented Reality with HoloCell (W, TBD)
Christian Jacob
TFDL Foyer

HoloCell is software for exploring the fascinating worlds of cell biology. Come and try out augmented reality glasses to holographically explore the complex worlds inside cells, and how this machinery of life makes our bodies tick.

• Christian Jacob is a professor in biochemistry and molecular biology as well as computer science.

12:00pm-1:00pm: Omnimedia and the Technologies of the Self, Patrick Finn & Owen Brierley

Omnimedia and the Technologies of the Self:

New Approaches to Storytelling in Teaching, Research, and Innovation

Patrick Finn and Owen Brierley

12-1pm, Gallery Hall  

We are in the midst of a new Renaissance fueled by the technological advances of digital technology. From robotics and artificial intelligence, to social media and gaming, our world has been altered on a scale not seen since the introduction of print technology. Unlike the technological revolution sparked by the introduction of moveable type, which took generations to transform our world, the changes we face have occurred within our lifetime. 

As artists, educators, and researchers, Colin Barden, Owen Brierley and Patrick Finn collaborate on projects that test the boundaries of the new Renaissance. Their approach, which they define as Omnimedia, explores questions related to the ways in which storytelling, teaching, research, and innovation have been forever altered by digital technology. The Omnimedia approach developed from the group’s ongoing work in areas such as multimedia, theatre, gaming, performance studies, and transdisciplinary approaches to artistic creation, teaching, and learning. Their practice, which engages the “technologies of the self,” studies advanced computational creations, virtual reality, and human performance practice (among other things) in order to uncover new ways of working and engaging our contemporary world. Following the inspiration of Beakerhead, their work is, “a smashup of art, science and engineering.” 

Join Owen and Patrick for a conversation about their team’s work, and what Omnimedia can do for you. 

  • Dr. Patrick Finn, Associate Professor, School of Creative and Performing Arts (SCPA) and Computational Media Design (CMD)
  • Owen Brierley, Executive Director, Edmonton Digital Arts College, Media Artist, and VJ
  • Colin Barden, Head of Sound, University Theatre Services, Media Artist, and DJ 

1:00pm-2:00pm: Making Time, Rob Furr

Making Time: Animated Art
Rob Furr
1-2pm, Gallery Hall

An interactive workshop examining the creation of art through time and movement, using stop motion animation, your cell phone, and you.

• Rob Furr is a designer, artist, and sculptor living in Calgary. He is also an Instructor in the Department of Art, focusing on digital media.

Thursday, September 15

10:00am-4:00pm: The Big House, Brandon Hearty

The Big House (W & Th, 10-4)
Brandon Hearty
TFDL Foyer

"The Big House" is a project that speaks about the relationship between mental wellness and escapism by incorporating layers of symbolism with imagery that connects test animals to human environments and history.

• Brandon Hearty is a Canadian-born studio artist, currently pursuing his MFA through the University of Calgary.

10:00am-4:00pm: Moving Data, Angela Rout

Moving Data: Data animations for public engagement (W & Th, 10-4)
Angela Rout
TFDL Foyer 

This display provides an animated visualization of spatial data. Current research investigates how visualizations like this can be used to support public engagement and decision making for urban planning projects. 

  • Angela Rout is a PhD student at the University of Calgary in Computational Media Design. 

10:00am-4:00pm: In Motion, Oksana Kryzhanivska with Jeffrey Boyd

In Motion (W & Th, 10-4; Oksana on site Thursday afternoon)
Oksana Kryzhanivska with Jeffrey Boyd
TFDL Foyer

Sense the physical connection to the universe intensified with scientific aesthetics of machine perception.

• Oksana Kryzhanivska is a PhD candidate in the Computational Media Design program at the University of Calgary.
• Jeffrey Boyd is an associate professor of computer science at the University of Calgary.

10:00am-4:00pm: Subject to Change, Joshua Taron with Jason Johnson

Subject to Change (W & Th, 10-4)
Joshua Taron with Jason Johnson
TFDL Foyer 

This 8'x8'x8' sculpted cube is the fifth in a series of sukkah's designed and fabricated by The Laboratory for Integrative Design for Calgary's Beth Tzedec, Congregation. The Hebrew characters for sukkah are embedded in the plan and elevations of the cube which when projected through the mass of the object form the space for inhabitation - a place of social gathering and celebration marking the end of the harvest season. The form is constructed of urethane coated CNC milled EPS foam chunks bolted to one another via aluminum plate joints. It is designed for easy transport, assembly and disassembly as the sukkah will be reused annually during the festival of the Sukkot. This particular sukkah can sit in three different positions thus allowing different orientations from year to year.  

  • Joshua M. Taron is an Assistant Professor of Architecture in the Faculty of Environmental Design
  • Jason Johnson is an Associate Professor of Architecture in the Faculty of Environmental Design

10:00am-4:00pm: Slicing the Aurora, Sebastion Lay <et al.>

Slicing the Aurora (W & Th, 10-4)
Sebastian Lay, Jo Vermeulen, Charles Perin, Eric Donovan, Raimund Dachselt, & Sheelagh Carpendale
TFDL Foyer

'Slicing the Aurora' is an interactive installation that allows viewers to explore beautiful images and videos taken of the Aurora Borealis over Canada. Find interesting patterns and correlations in months' worth of data, sort and compare different nights, and learn more about the fascinating phenomenon of the Northern Lights. The installation uses the data of the AuroraMAX project by the Auroral Imaging Group at the University of Calgary.

  • Sebastian Lay & colleagues from Computer Science & Physics as well as the Interactive Media Lab, Dresden.  

12:00pm-1:00pm: Talented Tech, Engineering Education Students’ Society (E2S2)

Talented Tech: Combining Engineering, Science, and Fine Arts

Engineering Education Students’ Society, Schulich School of Engineering 

12–1 pm, Gallery Hall 

Learn how engineering and science can be used to enhance performances and installations in the fine arts, including belly dancing, fashion, and visual art. 

The Engineering Education Students’ Society (E2S2) is a graduate research network for those pursuing research and development in the field of engineering education.  This work is supported by a GSA Quality Money grant.

1:00pm-2:00pm: Visualizing Imperceivable Sound, Brian Garbet

Visualizing Imperceivable Sound 
Brian Garbet
1-2pm, Visualization Studio, 4th floor, TFDL

Cymatics is the visualization of sound through physical mediums such as water. In this presentation, Brian will focus on visualizing low frequency noise pollution and infrasound (frequencies below the range of human hearing).

• Brian Garbet is a doctoral student in the School of Creative and Performing Arts.

1:00pm-4:00pm: The Cymascope, Angela Broad

The Cymascope: Visualization of Sonic Structures Using Physical Media, (W & Th, 1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Angela Broad
TFDL Foyer

Tibetan sand painting meets Cymatics (sonic visualization) in this fun and informal demonstration, that investigates the emergence of ‘Fourier Patterns’, which materialize when colored sand on a metal plate respond to specific frequencies of sound.

• Angela Broad is a MSc student in Computational Media Design program at the University of Calgary

2:00pm-3:00pm: A Tale of Collaboration Between an Artist and a Scientist, Lindsay MacDonald and Jo Vermeulen

A Tale of Collaboration Between an Artist and a Scientist
Lindsay MacDonald and Jo Vermeulen 

2-3pm Gallery Hall 

This is a story of the collusion of different research areas and approaches.  The artist and the scientist transform liminal spaces with technology—effecting perceptions and experience in intriguing ways. 

  • Lindsay MacDonald is a PhD candidate in the Computational Media Design Program at the University of Calgary. 
  • Jo Vermeulen is a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Interactions Lab at the University of Calgary.  

3:00pm-4:00pm: They Should Ask Us, Angela Rout

'They Should Ask Us!' Children, Maps, Collaboration and Technology in Designing Public Spaces
Angela Rout
3-4pm Gallery Hall

How can we make participatory processes a positive experience for everyone? Is there a way to incorporate the perspectives of children, families, and users of public space into a collaborative design process? This talk looks at using mapping and new technologies to uncover how we use public space, and give everyone a chance to voice their ideas.

• Angela Rout is a PhD student at the University of Calgary in Computational Media Design.